The Fall Shoe Report

Meghan Cleary

The shoescape for Fall 2010 is a promising one, full of exciting stories on silhouettes and materials as well as a return to some classic early-’90s toe shapes and lasts. Repertoires are also set to emphasize exotic skins and trims, mesh overlays, cutwork, and lattice.
At YSL, the best selling Tribute platform gets a welcome update in the form of an upturned toe, chiseled platform, and curved heel, some with fringe detailing, and a bootie with a dropped, much chunkier heel in cobalt and black suede. At Prada, both the square and the pointy toes vied for comebacks with chunky heeled loafers (paired with thick, cabled tights) and sweet yet severe, pointy-toed patent stilettos with skinny bow detailing, all in turquoise, puce, and purple patent with contrasting trim.

Chrissie Morris has deservedly seen her profile skyrocket not only by adding Bellhaus and Kirna Zabete, but Tender, Zainab, and The Wynn to her roster of retailers, in addition to acquiring her own factory in Italy after only six short seasons. On the materials side, she remains an innovator to watch, pairing a material loved by surfers–neoprene with stingray accents, as well as velcro and stretch leather as “bandage” accents. Her intriguing new use of magnets–running vertically down the heels, allowing for magnetized trims to be taken on and off at will, pairing skin accents with a plain shoe depending on the wearer’s mood–in her shoes have never been seen before. A favorite of fashion influencers from Queen Rania to Jada Pinkett Smith, Morris’ angular cutwork, vertiginous platforms, and feathers round out the collection.

Nicole Brundage continues to light up the landscape with a chunky parenthesis heel and whimsical bow-wrap details in an autumnal palette of burnished brown leathers, steel velvets, and washed metallic slate grey suedes. Her new endeavor, Acrobats of God, features a more pared-down sensibility with wooden heels and thick elastic straps on every style, which are being eaten up by shoppers everywhere from Opening Ceremony to Le Bon Marche–where a special pop-up store featured the shoes prominently this Spring. Fall sees Acrobats of God move into deeper hues from saturated navy to black, introducing a modified t-strap style and aggressive tread soles.

Celebs from Dita von Teese to Britney Spears continue to embrace Max Kibardin‘s peep-toe ankle booties and skyscraper stilettos with oversize ankle bows, as well as his refined latticework and sophisticated lasts. Metallics like glossy gold and burnished copper stand out, as well as grey and black satin, with such accents as delicate feathers to chunky rectangular crystals. A refined pointy toe also makes a comeback here in quite a few elegant evening sandal looks that feature cutwork so delicate it seems to be suspended on the foot.

Two bright new stars out of London join forces with the collaboration of United Nude and Iris van Herpen, an Amsterdam expat apparel designer whose made-to-order creations usually sell for $1,295 a pair. Turning out futuristic hoof-like platforms in black and glossy gold with slashed leather detailing, at a mere £300 these avant-garde creations are worth a second, third, and fourth look. Recent graduate Rick Goodwin makes shoes–fetish-inspired, turned-toe, extreme platforms with severe box-toe accents and details including nails hanging from the heel–which compliment and take inspiration from his handmade helmets. These one-of-a-kind creations are still being made in his home studio, so catch them while you can.

Will Tabitha Simmons continue her stint as the shoe world’s latest It Girl with her mix of exotic skins and old-world informed silhouettes? Will Rick Owens persevere as the master of gutsy, hard, angular elegance in the platform? We are looking forward to finding out.




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